Patron Saint of Mediocrities

rincewindsapprentice:

Some people love to shut down people who talk about trans and intersex issues by saying that they’re “only 1% of the population” and thus can be ignored since they “aren’t statistically significant enough.”

By that logic, we can now systematically ignore:

  • Redheads
  • The entire state of Rhode Island
  • Anyone who makes over $500,000 a year
  • Pacific Islanders
  • Australia

aiffe:

I’ve been thinking for a while that we need some kind of umbrella term for literally everyone who isn’t a cis man, and what I came up with was MVP - Misogyny Vulnerable People.

I think this is important because people who are women both cis and trans, people who were assigned female, and people who are non-binary, all experience or have experienced and fear reexperiencing misogyny, all can be thrown under the misogyny bus in a way cis men just can’t. It seems that misogyny isn’t just something directed at those who identify as women, but that the state of cis masculinity, like whiteness and straightness, is something fragile that can be tainted with the merest brush of the Other.

I also see feminism as having multiple objectives—one objective is “protect women at all costs” and yes that means ALL female-identified people, but another objective is “end misogyny and protect people from misogyny” and that includes EVERYONE misogyny is levied at, all the MVPs, because misogyny is fucking awful and needs to stop. I know the people under this umbrella encompass a diverse set of genders and experiences, but I think this shared experience of misogyny is important and needs to be defined separate from gender.

I will use the term “romantic friendship” to describe a close affectionate relationship between two men who were social equals. The term has been used extensively in scholarship focusing on the effusive writings of young male couples during the mid-nineteenth century, usually with the implied understanding that the relationship was not sexual (despite the steamy rhetoric of the surviving correspondence). I will use the term with the explicit contention that a romantic friendship might indeed have included a sexual component, since I have come to believe that eighteenth-century Americans did not draw borders around sexual behavior with quite the clarity and severity of their Victorian successors. A fluidity to male intimacy admitted a wide repertoire of physical expression, and those expressions ebbed and flowed with time and circumstance.

Romantic friendships usually arose between men of similar age and social class. The relationships were passionate but in most cases fleeting, not because the men were unable or unwilling to make a lasting commitment, but because they could not envision a future in which they could ever consider themselves to be a recognized couple. America included only one city that could begin to rival the size and social complexity of Berlin, Paris, or London. Only Philadelphia was large enough to provide men-loving men with the anonymity of numbers. In rural areas among the lower classes it might be possible for two men to live their lives together working the same farm or pursuing the same craft, but in more urban areas, especially among the socially prominent (whose stories are the ones most likely to be preserved in surviving documents), heterosexual marriage was the only acceptable goal. Men entered into romantic friendships with the understanding that one - and probably both - of the partners would eventually marry and establish a traditional family. Though many tried to maintain an emotional connection with their partner, the demands of their new roles as husband and father rarely allowed for continued intimacy. This arc from passionate devotion to wistful nostalgia is documented again and again whenever long runs of male-male letters have been preserved.

William Benemann, Male-Male Intimacy in Early America (via publius-esquire)

THIS IS HOW YOU TALK ABOUT ROMANTIC FRIENDSHIPS THANK YOU

(via madtomedgar)

A good ally understands this. A good ally is more than just someone who is not racist or not transphobic or not homophobic or not sexist. A good ally works actively for the liberation of others and knows when to check their privilege. A good ally might attend the ROMBA conference because they genuinely care about LGBTQ issues and people. They would not register just to crash the LGBTQ job fair. A good ally would recognize that the whole wide world is a straight job fair and maybe they should let their LGBTQ friends have this one opportunity.

ylissean-bride:

adventuresofcesium:

i can’t stop thinking about how the only reason that the fire nation didn’t manage to conquer and destroy the world is because katara flipped a shit on her brother for making a sexist comment and stumbled upon aang in the iceberg

The lesson here is that you should never let a sexist comment fly idly by because it might mean the end of the world

misandryad:

I’d like more earnest romantic comedies with two Nice characters and not a girl who apparently needs to be taken down a couple of pegs by an asshole who I guess has a heart of gold behind his mean rude exterior

Orlando Bloom in Wilde (1997)
By 1908, concerned men and women could complete a psychometric test, ‘Am I At All a Uranian?’, answer questions such as ‘Do you whistle well, and naturally like to do so? Do you feel at ease in the dress of the opposite sex? Are you peculiarly fond of Wagner?’ and calculate the nature of their sexual identity in terms of percentage points.

Matthew Sweet, Inventing the Victorians

At the SDCC panel, John Logan mentioned this book as a “Bible” for reference in writing his scripts for Penny Dreadful.

Suddenly Dorian’s line to Ethan in “Demimonde” about “I’d ask you if you’d heard Wagner before, but you’d just say no” got 1000x funnier.

(via bisexual-sharp-shooting-werewolf)

sunday snippet

“I would like another tour of the factory complex,” said Mr. Althorp.

Aubrey limited himself to a single blink of confusion.

“Yes, sir,” he said. “If you’ll wait here just a moment, I’ll fetch Mr. Jennings.”

“Forgive me,” said Mr. Althorp, holding out a hand to stay Aubrey’s progress towards Mr. Jennings’ office door. “I’m afraid I’ve been unclear. I should like you to direct my tour. If at all possible.”

Aubrey did not raise his eyebrows at his new employer, however dearly he might have wished to.

“If you found Mr. Jennings’ tour to be insufficient, I fear mine would not suit much better,” said Aubrey.

“No?” said Mr. Althorp. His tone bespoke genuine surprise. “Why not?”

Why not, indeed, thought Aubrey with more sarcasm than he dared express openly. Out loud, he said, “Mr. Jennings’ knowledge of the factory is unparalleled. A tour directed by myself would be far less informative.”

“Perhaps,” said Mr. Althorp. “But in my experience, the more knowledgeable the speaker, the drier the speech. Thus, in the presence of ‘unparalleled knowledge’, as you put it, one finds one’s attention wandering, and one in fact learns very little.”

Aubrey suspected Mr. Althorp’s attention would wander if a stray mote of dust happened to float into his peripheral vision. There certainly were enough of them about.

“Correct me if I mistake your meaning, sir,” said Aubrey. “You believe my ignorance to be advantageous to your purpose?”

“Yes!” said Mr. Althorp with a triumphant grin. It didn’t last long. “I mean, that is to say––Not ‘ignorance’, precisely—”

ladysaviours:

I maintain that Cabaret should get a new film adaptation, but I’m watching the original on tv, and it’s actually got some good moments

"you’re about as fatale as an after-dinner mint!"

Cabaret will always be on my list of favorite movies, if only for the sake of “…so do I.”

windandwater replied to your quote “I LOVE GAY VICTORIANS I WANT A WHOLE SERIES DAMMIT & IN ONE BOOK CAN…”
LET THEM SOLVE CRIMES TOGETHER
Gay Victorians Solve A Murder. Gay Victorians in a Submarine. Tomorrow is the Time for Gay Victorians; the Spacefuture.
I CAN ONLY TYPE SO FAST
I LOVE GAY VICTORIANS I WANT A WHOLE SERIES DAMMIT & IN ONE BOOK CAN THEY GO TO SEA, PLEASE

my sister

I tried to tell her she had essentially described Moby-Dick but she pointed out that Ishmael is not an aristocrat, so there’s that at least.

princess-sparklemullet:

ryeisenberg:

ryeisenberg:

  • It’s called Master of the Universe.
  • It was originally published on Fanfiction.net (aka where fanfiction goes to die).
  • E.L. James’ pen name was Snowqueens Icedragon because of course it was.
  • Snowqueens Icedragon does not use quotation marks. 
  • She does, however, make up expressions like "my very small inner goddess sways in a gentle victorious samba" and “I can almost hear his sphinx-like smile through the phone.”
  • They spend more time filling out sex-related paperwork than they do actually having sex.
  • This is my reaction to all of the sex scenes:
  • image
  • Because the human body doesn’t work like that
  • This is my reaction to everything else:
  • image
  • Because the english language doesn’t work like that.

The 50 Shades of Grey trailer just dropped, so here’s a link to the original Twilight fanfiction that the book is “based” off of, because if you’re gonna read the book before you see the movie you might as well read it in its original format. 

Oh my god it has those banner photoshop graphics we all spent at least a week thinking were really cool and a sign of a quality fic

Casual reminder of how much E. L. James hates the Twilight fandom.

this is not helpful at all, but I am probably gonna call them gay victorians 5ever.
Gay Victorians 5ever is the fifth book in the Now is the Time for Gay Victorians series.